image
image
Step On Guides
Step On Guided Tours 2017 Rates

Since 1977! The oldest and most respected step on guide

service in the Great Smoky Mountains!

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.

The winds will blow their freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like falling leaves.” John Muir

Let our guide board your motorcoach and take your group on a Smoky Mountain Adventure!

Historic, Humorous and Informative!

Step on Guide Service Rates

Winterfest Light Tour 1.5 Hours $90

3 Hour Tour $150 

One Way Tours $195

Additional Hour $35

  • ALL DEPOSITS ARE DUE UPON BOOKING
  • ALL BALANCES ARE DUE 30 DAYS OUT
  • $50 TOUR Deposit per bus / per tour / $50 TICKET Deposit per bus (if applicable) / $100 FOOD DEPOSIT per bus (if applicable)
  • FOOD/TICKET count needed is required 45 DAYS OUT prior to arrival.  NO COMPS ON BOX PICNIC LUNCH
  • Detailed Invoice will be sent out when we receive the final count
  • *DOES NOT INCLUDE TRANSPORTATION*
  • Cancellation Policy: 30 DAYS PRIOR TO ARRIVAL FOR FULL REFUND.

Picnic Lunch –Recommended for 4 or more hour tours

Let your group experience a fun-filled picnic in the Smokies! 

Call today for booking information.

Box Picnic Lunch: $14 per person

6 inch ham or turkey served on French bread, pickle, chips, cookie, fruit cup and drink (soft drink selection or bottled water)

 

 


Tour Descriptions

Winterfest Lights November & December approximately 1 ½ -2 Hours   Winterfest in the Smokies is a spectacular event, but to locals and visitors alike, it means one thing: LIGHTS!!! Over 9 million lights go on in early November to turn Sevier County into a magical winter fairyland. The lights are on every evening during the wintertime and now every display is environmentally friendly LED. The city of Pigeon Forge celebrates Winterfest with 5 million lights! Snowflakes and pine boughs deck every street light in Pigeon Forge, and in historic Patriot Park, we will see majestic light displays. Downtown you will find everything from the 12 days of Christmas to your favorite nursery rhyme. The City of Gatlinburg magically lights up the winter nights with millions of spectacular lights and lighted displays. Displays featuring animals indigenous to Great Smoky Mountains National Park including deer, foxes, squirrels and rabbits are part of the program, with the length of the Parkway accentuated by branches and scrolls. Most recently, fanciful snowmen, dancing fountains, a group of international children and a shiny rocking horse joined the lineup.

Newfound Gap approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Scenic Photo Stops, Newfound Gap, Rockefeller Memorial & the Appalachian Trail Our most popular tour! For the group that wants to experience the Smokies, but doesn’t have a great deal of time, our mountain top tour is perfect!  Travel the scenic mountain road around the famous “Loop” by way of the high-rising Chimney Tops.  At the top of the mountain we will stop at Newfound Gap which marks the Tennessee, North Carolina State line.  You will have opportunities for photos at scenic stops along the way. At an elevation of 5,048 feet, Newfound Gap is the lowest drivable pass through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Half lies in Tennessee and half in North Carolina. Rockefeller Memorial honors a $5 million donation from the Rockefeller Foundation to help complete land acquisitions to bring about the reality of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Appalachian Trail crosses over Newfound Gap Road and straddles the state line between North Carolina and Tennessee for most of its length through the park.

Laurel Falls approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Hike to Laurel falls The Great Smoky Mountains abound with the two ingredients essential for waterfalls—ample rainfall and an elevation gradient. In the Smokies high country, over 85” of rain falls on average each year. During wet years, peaks like Mt. Le Conte and Clingmans Dome receive over eight feet of rain. This abundant rainfall trickles and rushes down the mountain sides, from high elevation to low, sometimes dropping more than a mile in elevation from the high peaks to the foothills at the park’s boundary. Laurel Falls is one of the most popular destinations in the park and parking at the trailhead is limited. The area is especially busy on weekends year-round and on weekdays during summer. Laurel Branch and the 80-foot high Laurel Falls are named for mountain laurel, an evergreen shrub which blooms along the trail and near the falls in May. The trail is 2.6 miles roundtrip and considered moderate in difficulty. The trail is paved and is suitable for strollers. Limits apply to this tour.                                                

Mini-Back Roads Tour - Foot Hills approximately 3 Hours Highlights:  Scenic Photo Stops, & Foot Hills Parkway Earlier settlers had lived off the land by hunting the wildlife, utilizing the timber for buildings and fences, growing food, and pasturing livestock in the clearings. As the decades passed, many areas that had once been forest became fields and pastures. People farmed, attended church, hauled their grain to the mill, and maintained community ties in a typically rural fashion. Learn about early mountain people – their way of life, faith, traditions, music, crafts & food. Enjoy the countryside as we take to the “back roads” to see the simpler side of our area and hear history of Appalachia; including some of the traditions of the mountain people. Hear history of Great Smoky Mountain National Park.  Explore the area known as the Moonshine Capital of the World that inspired the movie Thunder Road (1958). Hear some of the infamous stories of “moonshine” and see some of the country where “white lightening” was brewed.

Mini-Back Roads Tour Bush Beans approximately 3 Hours Highlights:  Downtown Sevierville & the Dolly Statue & Bush Beans General Store and Visitor Center! You will have opportunities for photos at scenic stops along the way. The group will then make their way to Sevierville - Founded in 1795, named for John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. It is the oldest and largest of Sevier County's four cities and is the eighth oldest town in Tennessee. The 105-year-old Sevier County Courthouse with a clock that strikes every half hour in the time-honored tradition. It is also home to the statue of Dolly Parton on the courthouse lawn was sculpted by local artist Jim Gray. We will then hit the back roads and visit Bush Beans Visitor Center located in the town where it all began, Chestnut Hill, Tennessee. It has the original general store A.J. Bush opened, a theater, exhibits showcasing the Bush's Story along with a café and General Store.

The Heart of the Smokies the Life of Dolly Parton Mini Tour Approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Downtown Sevierville, Court House & Dolly Statue See the statue of Dolly Parton at the Sevier County Court House, and hear some of her childhood stories and experiences as well as her influential contributions to the Sevier County area. During this tour you will learn about one of the Smokies greatest treasures Dolly Rebecca Parton. Born in nearby Locust Ridge on January 19, 1946, to Lee and Avie Lee Parton and grew up in the shadow of her beloved Smoky Mountains with her 11 brothers and sisters. Dolly Parton was appearing regularly on WSEV radio in Sevierville before she was ten years old and was also a regular on a Knoxville television program, "The Cas Walker Show.” To date, she remains one of the most successful country artists, with 26 number-one singles (a record for a female performer) and 42 top-10 country albums (more than anyone else). She is one of the wealthiest female entertainers in the world. Parton invested much of her earnings into business ventures in her native East Tennessee. Since the mid-1980s Parton has been praised for her many charitable efforts, particularly in the area of literacy. Her literacy program, Dolly Parton's "Imagination Library", which mails one book per month to children from the time of their birth until they enter kindergarten, began in Sevier County, Tennessee, but has now been replicated in 566 counties across thirty-six U.S. states (as well as Canada). She was honored as a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress for her work.

Clingman’s Dome approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Scenic Photo Stops, Newfound Gap, Rockefeller Memorial, the Appalachian Trail, 30-minute, steep half-mile walk to the tower at the top and views that expand over a 100 miles. At 6,643 feet, Clingman's Dome is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Named after Civil War General and U.S. Senator Thomas Lanier Clingman; It is the highest point in Tennessee, and the third highest point in the Appalachian Mountain range. Only Mt. Mitchell (6,684 feet) and Mt. Craig (6,647) in Mt. Mitchell State Park rise higher. The Appalachian Trail crosses Clingman's Dome, marking the highest point along its journey from Georgia to Maine. Spectacular vistas await those willing to climb a 30-minute, steep half-mile walk to the tower at the top, which sits equally in both North Carolina and Tennessee. On clear, pollution-free days, views expand over a 100 miles. However, air pollution limits average viewing distances to 22 miles. Cloudy days, precipitation, and cold temperatures reveal the hostile environment atop Clingman's Dome.

Arts & Crafts approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Arts & Crafts shopping, Tennessee Heritage Arts & Crafts Trail and Cliff Dwellers TM Gallery the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community is the largest group of independent artisans in North America. This historic 8-mile loop has been designated a Tennessee Heritage Arts & Crafts Trail. Established in 1937, these artisans whittle, paint, sew, cast, weave and carve to create original collectables such as candles, baskets, quilts, brooms, pottery, jewelry, dolls, ceramics, scrimshaw, silversmithing, leather, stained glass, wearable fashions, and fine photography, frame able art, oils and watercolors. You will also find lodging, restaurants, cafes, tea room, soda fountain and candy shops.  Most have learned their trade from family members and will pass it on to future generations.  Enjoy a stop at the Cliff Dwellers TM Gallery, a showplace for contemporary and traditional fine arts and crafts. The historic building was moved from downtown Gatlinburg to the foothills of the Great Smokies at 668 Glades Road in the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community. The Gallery is owned and operated as a cooperative by six local artists and carries the work of approximately 60 other area artists who have been invited to be a part of the Gallery. Come with us to revisit the past with these world-renowned artists and their way of life.         

MINI 3 CITY TOUR approximately 3 Hours Highlights: Scenic Photo Stops, Gatlinburg bypass, Sugarlands Visitor Center, Sevier County Court house, Dolly Statue, Apple Barn and Old Mill Village Begin the tour by driving into Gatlinburg to learn about the founding and development of this mountain city. 1st stop is the Sugarland's Visitor Center - free admission includes a 20-minute film about the park and extensive natural history exhibits. Next stop: Sevierville - Founded in 1795 and incorporated in 1901, named for John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. It is the oldest and largest of Sevier County's four cities and is the eighth oldest town in Tennessee. The 105-year-old Sevier County Courthouse with a clock that strikes every half hour in the time-honored tradition It is also home to the statue of Dolly Parton on the courthouse lawn was sculpted by local artist Jim Gray and unveiled by Miss Parton herself on May 2, 1987, with her parents in attendance. Next stop on our 3 city tour is the Apple Barn Cider Mill & General Store.  Last stop Pigeon Forge & Old Mill Square. Today, The Old Mill is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the most photographed mills in the country. The area's heritage is preserved through the products produced at the Old mill and a variety of crafts sold in the Old Mill Square. The Pigeon River Pottery has been home to pottery making for over forty years, and the best of time-tested recipes are prepared in the Old Mill Candy Kitchen. The entire Square is a working tribute to the Smokies' pioneer days.

One-Way Cherokee Adventure approximately 2.5- 3 Hours Begins in NC or TN Begins in Cherokee, NC or Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge or Sevierville, TN Highlights: Scenic Photo Stops, Newfound Gap, Rockefeller Memorial, the Appalachian Trail, National Park Visitor Center, Qualla Arts & Crafts Shop Our Adventure begins in the Great Smoky Mountains; America’s most visited National Park.  Traveling up the Tennessee side of the mountain we will pass the Chimneys and Morton Overlook with panoramic picture stops along the way.  Don’t forget your camera! Then it is on to Newfound Gap, the top of the mountain, where we cross the state line for our descent into North Carolina.  A stop will be made at a National Park Visitor Center.  For an unforgettably enriching experience, we will visit the town of Cherokee and experience the wonders of historical exhibits and unique crafts. There is no other travel destination quite like Cherokee, so prepare yourself to open your mind and begin to fathom the complex and often heartbreaking history of the Cherokee people.

One-Way America’s First Frontier - Knoxville One way Pigeon Forge to Knoxville approximately 3 hours  Additional Fee $ Present-day Knoxville is in the heart of the Great Valley of East Tennessee and at the headwaters of the Tennessee River. This makes the city a center for the region's economy, culture, and history. The natural resources and river-generated power helped establish Knoxville as an important "New Deal" city in the early 20th century, as a gateway to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and as headquarters to the Tennessee Valley Authority. Our first stop of the day is the Sunsphere. This unique Knoxville landmark was built for the 1982 World's Fair.  Visit the Sunsphere's newly reopened observation deck for great 360-degree view of downtown Knoxville and beyond. There are also four television monitors displaying a variety of presentations including one on World's Fair Park.  One panel points out that from the windows of the Sunsphere a viewer can see the locations where Knoxville's history played out including where both the city and the State of Tennessee were born; where the Treaty of the Holston was signed with the Cherokee Nation; where the Civil War battle of Fort Sanders was fought and where millions visited the World's Fair 25 years ago. The final stop of the tour will be Blount Mansion(additional fee)  - the home and capitol of the first and only governor of the Southwest Territory, William Blount, his family, and ten African-Americans. Blount was a signer of the US Constitution and played a pivotal role in Tennessee becoming the sixteenth state.

BLONDES, BEANS & BACK ROADS! East Tennessee’s Hometown Best approximately 5 Hours   Includes, Lunch on own, Downtown Sevierville & the Dolly Statue & Bush Beans General Store and Visitor Center! You will have opportunities for photos at scenic stops along the way. The group will then make their way to Sevierville - Founded in 1795, named for John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. It is the oldest and largest of Sevier County's four cities and is the eighth oldest town in Tennessee. The 105-year-old Sevier County Courthouse with a clock that strikes every half hour in the time-honored tradition. It is also home to the statue of Dolly Parton on the courthouse lawn was sculpted by local artist Jim Gray. We will then hit the back roads and visit Bush Beans Visitor Center located in the town where it all began, Chestnut Hill, Tennessee. It has the original general store A.J. Bush opened, a theater, exhibits showcasing the Bush's Story along with a café and General Store.

Cherokee Adventure approximately 5 Hours Highlights: Scenic Photo Stops, Newfound Gap, Rockefeller Memorial, the Appalachian Trail, National Park Visitor Center and free time in Cherokee Our Cherokee Adventure begins in the Great Smoky Mountains; America’s most visited National Park.  Traveling up the Tennessee side of the mountain we will pass the Chimneys and Morton Overlook with panoramic picture stops along the way.  Don’t forget your camera! Then it is on to Newfound Gap, the top of the mountain, where we cross the state line for our descent into North Carolina.  A stop will be made at a National Park Visitor Center.  For an unforgettably enriching experience, we will visit the town of Cherokee and experience the wonders of historical exhibits, plays, music and unique crafts. There is no other travel destination quite like Cherokee, so prepare yourself to open your mind and begin to fathom the complex and often heartbreaking history of the Cherokee people. Your group will learn about the museums and village and the fascinating customs, language, weapons and crafts that in part define the character of these resilient and passionate people. A cultural learning experience at Cherokee will be one that you will carry with you wherever you go. People have occupied these mountains since prehistoric times, but it was not until the 20th century that human activities began to profoundly affect the natural course of events here. When the first white settlers reached the Great Smoky Mountains in the late 1700s they found themselves in the land of the Cherokee Indians. The tribe, one of the most culturally advanced on the continent, had permanent towns, cultivated croplands, sophisticated political systems, and extensive networks of trails. Most of the Cherokee were forcibly removed in the 1830s to Oklahoma in a tragic episode known as the "trail of Tears. The few who remained are the ancestors of the Cherokees living near the park today. Additional Fee $                 

The Heart of the Smokies - Historic Sevierville - the life of Dolly Parton approximately 5 Hours Highlights: Downtown Sevierville, Court House & Dolly Statue Founded in 1795 and incorporated in 1901, Sevierville was named for John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. See the statue of Dolly Parton at the Sevier County Court House, and hear some of her childhood stories and experiences as well as her influential contributions to the Sevier County area. More than just a beautiful place for a vacation, Sevierville is a community with a proud heritage and history. The statue of Dolly Parton on the courthouse lawn was sculpted by local artist Jim Gray and unveiled by Miss Parton herself on May 2, 1987, with her parents in attendance. There's also a statue on the courthouse lawn in remembrance of our veterans. The tour will tell you about one of our greatest treasures. Sevierville, Tennessee is the oldest of Sevier County's four sister cities, it is also the 8th oldest town in Tennessee. Sevierville has a popular heritage-daughter Dolly Rebecca Parton was born in nearby Locust Ridge on January 19, 1946, to Lee and Avie Lee Parton and grew up in the shadow of her beloved Smoky Mountains with her 11 brothers and sisters. Dolly Parton was appearing regularly on WSEV radio in Sevierville before she was ten years old and was also a regular on a Knoxville television program, "The Cas Walker Show.” To date, she remains one of the most successful country artists, with 26 number-one singles (a record for a female performer) and 42 top-10 country albums (more than anyone else). She is one of the wealthiest female entertainers in the world. Parton invested much of her earnings into business ventures in her native East Tennessee. Since the mid-1980s Parton has been praised for her many charitable efforts, particularly in the area of literacy. Her literacy program, Dolly Parton's "Imagination Library", which mails one book per month to children from the time of their birth until they enter kindergarten, began in Sevier County, Tennessee, but has now been replicated in 566 counties across thirty-six U.S. states (as well as Canada). She was honored as a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress for her work.

3 City Tour approximately 5 Hours Highlights: Sugarland’s Visitor Center, Scenic Gatlinburg By-Pass, Old Mill Village, Court House, Dolly Statue & Apple Barn Begin the tour by driving into Gatlinburg to learn about the founding and development of this mountain city. 1st stop is the Sugarland’s Visitor Center - free admission includes a 20-minute film about the park and extensive natural history exhibits. Short walk along the Sugarland’s self guiding nature trail includes - accessible interpretive exhibits located along the one-half mile paved trail as the trail winds through second growth forest along the West Prong of the Little Pigeon River. Next stop Pigeon Forge & Old Mill Square. Today, The Old Mill is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the most photographed mills in the country. The area's heritage is preserved through the products produced at the Old mill and a variety of crafts sold in the Old Mill Square. The Pigeon River Pottery has been home to pottery making for over forty years, and the best of time-tested recipes are prepared in the Old Mill Candy Kitchen. The entire Square is a working tribute to the Smokies' pioneer days. Next stop: Sevierville - Founded in 1795 and incorporated in 1901, named for John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. It is the oldest and largest of Sevier County's four cities and is the eighth oldest town in Tennessee. The 105-year-old Sevier County Courthouse with a clock that strikes every half hour in the time-honored tradition It is also home to the statue of Dolly Parton on the courthouse lawn was sculpted by local artist Jim Gray and unveiled by Miss Parton herself on May 2, 1987, with her parents in attendance. Last stop on our 3 city tour is the Apple Barn Cider Mill & General Store.

Little River Tour approximately 5 hours Highlights: Sugarland’s Visitor Center, Scenic Little River Road, Townsend Tennessee This Scenic drive follows the “Little” River on the way to Townsend – the peaceful side of the Smokies. Hear the stories of the mountain people & lumbermen & CCC’s and railroad companies that forged a living along the Little River. Prior to 1900, this area of the Little River Valley and the surrounding tributary streams was called Tuckaleechee Cove – a name meaning “peaceful valley,” with farming being the livelihood of most families. For about 40 years there was a lot of commercial lumbering ended by the establishment of the National Park. The agricultural pattern of life in the Great Smoky Mountains changed with the arrival of lumbering in the early 1900s. Within 20 years, the largely self-sufficient economy of the people here was almost entirely replaced by dependence on manufactured items, store bought food, and cash. Logging boom towns sprang up overnight at sites that still bear their names: Elkmont, Smokemont, Proctor and Tremont. Loggers were rapidly cutting the great primeval forests that remained on these mountains. Unless the course of events could be quickly changed, there would be little left of the region’s special character and wilderness resources. Intervention came when Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established in 1934. Additional Fee $

Mountain Heritage and Folklore Tour approximately 5 hours Highlights: Sugarland’s Visitor Center, Ownby & Trentham Cemetery, Short walk to Cataract Falls, Arrowmont Arts & Crafts School, Arrowcraft Shop & Historic Ogle Cabin with free time for lunch on own in The Village Life for the early European settlers was primitive, but by the 1900s there was little difference between the mountain people and their contemporaries living in rural areas beyond the mountains. Earlier settlers had lived off the land by hunting the wildlife, utilizing the timber for buildings and fences, growing food, and pasturing livestock in the clearings. As the decades passed, many areas that had once been forest became fields and pastures. People farmed, attended church, hauled their grain to the mill, and maintained community ties in a typically rural fashion. This tour focuses on the early mountain people – their way of life, traditions, music, crafts & food. Enjoy an easy walk to Cataract Falls and see excellent examples of flora and fauna. Learn about the Sugarland’s or “Forks of the River” settlement. Venture into Gatlinburg to learn about the founding and development of this mountain city. Visit Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts - the 3rd leading arts & crafts school in the nation. Our final stop is Arrowcraft Shop the oldest continuously operating business in Gatlinburg. Adjacent is the Ogle Cabin the oldest structure in Gatlinburg. Enjoy free time at “The Village” for shopping & lunch on your own.  

Cades Cove approximately 5 Hours Highlights: Scenic photo stops, Cable Mill & Visitor Center Cades Cove, a 6,800-acre valley near Townsend, Tennessee provides a representative sample of natural and cultural history as well as its recreational opportunities. Cades Cove receives approximately 2 million visitors each year. The story of Cades Cove begins with its very shape and rocks. It is known as a window, meaning that mountains of older rocks surround the valley floor of younger rocks. Evidence suggests that the Appalachian orogeny (or mountain building event) occurred approximately 240 million years ago and that the mountains have been weathering and eroding ever since. This fertile valley supports a wide diversity of plants and animals. The valley floor has approximately 2,400 acres of largely open fields surrounded by forests. Bison, elk, mountain lions, and wolves are among the animals that have been extirpated from the Smokies. Whitetail deer are seen on most early morning or evening visits to Cades Cove. Black bear and wild turkey are less frequently sighted. River otters and barn owls have been reintroduced into the Cove; however, these secretive animals are rarely seen. The Cove also contains a nineteenth century grist mill, historic homes, and churches. The remaining buildings and surrounding landscapes begin to tell the story of Cades Cove's cultural history. An eleven-mile, one-way loop road encircles the valley floor. The forest—at least the 20% that remained uncut within park boundaries—was saved. More than 1,200 land-owners had to leave their land once the park was established. They left behind many farm buildings, mills, schools, and churches. Over 70 of these structures have since been preserved so that Great Smoky Mountains National Park now contains the largest collection of historic log buildings in the East.

Back Roads Tour approximately 6 Hours Highlights:  Scenic Photo Stops, “Old Town Sevierville & the Dolly Parton statue, Douglas Dam & Lake, Historic Dandridge (36 historic buildings), with options for Carver Orchard, the Arts & Crafts Community or the Foot Hills Parkway Enjoy the countryside as we take to the “back roads” to see the simpler side of our area and hear history of Appalachia; including some of the traditions of the mountain people and the impact of the TVA upon the area. See the statue of Dolly Parton and hear some of her childhood stories and experiences as well as her influential contributions to the Sevier County area. Hear history of Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Visit Dandridge, one of the oldest towns in the state. Explore the area known as the Moonshine Capital of the World that inspired the movie Thunder Road (1958). Hear some of the infamous stories of “moonshine” and see some of the country where “white lightening” was brewed. Depending on time your guide may choose to add one of the following: one of the oldest family owned orchards in east Tennessee, beautiful mountain vistas from the Foothills Parkway or one stop in Arts and Crafts - "see the Gatlinburg of the past." Group will have lunch opportunity on own or we can arrange a lunch stop at a local cafe. Additional Fee $

The “Scruffy City Tour” – Knoxville, TN- approximately 6 Hours On this tour you can relive the golden era of Knoxville, from the 1880’s to the 1920’s. Stroll down historic Gay Street with its vintage street lights and art deco theaters: including the Tennessee Theatre, where the movie “Thunder Road” premiered.  Childhood memories cone to life again as we visit an old time 1920’s type general store complete with penny candy, farmers almanacs, and creaky wood floors. Just across the tracks is the “Old City” or what was known as the “Bowery? Home to the scruffy city’s opium dens, bordello and rag-tag saloons. You can eat and shop at the historic “market square”, Knoxville’s original farmers market. This area is also home to many country music stars; here performers like Chet Atkins, Roy Acuff, Tennessee Ernie Ford and many others got their start. See where Hank Williams Sr. spent the last night of his life. Knoxville is also full of history; it was the territorial and state capital, see where the Volunteer state began – at the house of many eyes. Next we cross the “T: (Tennessee River) to see the home of the “Running T” Neyland Stadium. Civil war history comes to life as we travel down Kingston Pike once the dividing line between the union and confederate forces. Here you can see the antebellum homes once used by both sides during the war. Lastly, well stop at “Worlds Fair Park”, home to the 1982, Worlds Fair. You’ll hear stories about the fair, find out why Knoxville became known as the “scruffy city” and ride the elevator to the top of the “Sun” – the Sunsphere.  Additions $$ for this tour: John Sevier Home, East Tennessee History Center, Blount Mansion, Crescent Bend, Grey Cemetery, or James White Fort and more.

The “Secret City” Tour – Appalachia to Oakridge Approximately 8 Hours Highlights: Museum of Appalachia, Museum of Science & Energy, Norris Dam Visit two historic cities, representing two different eras. Tour the most complete and authentic replica of pioneer Appalachian life at the Museum of Appalachia, located 16 miles north of Knoxville in Norris, Tennessee. The 65-acre complex includes dozens of authentic log structures, the Appalachian Hall of Fame building showcasing unusual mountain relics, the Mountain Heritage Room, live mountain musicians, traditional farm animals and an extensive craft and gift shop. Groups can see the newly opened Revolution-Era exhibit, showcasing 200 important artifacts from this period including Gov. John Sevier's family bible, printed in 1571 and reputed to be the oldest bible in the US; a rare American-made Revolutionary War musket; a copper bleeding bowl and "bleeding" instruments; and a Continental army sword. Oak Ridge, TN, known as the “Secret City”, was the home of the “Manhattan Project”, during World War II and the development of the first atomic bomb. Tour the Museum of Science and Energy, representing the world of tomorrow (additional fee per person). Through film and exhibits, the museum documents the story of Oak Ridge, constructed in 1942 during World War II, and the site of the historic Manhattan Project, where the US government developed the atomic bomb. Then visit Norris, TN, home of the Norris Dam, built by the TVA.  Additional Fee $

Historic Asheville, NC & Blue Ridge Parkway Tour approximately 9 Hours Highlights: Scenic photo stops, Southern Highland Craft Guild Folk Art Center, Billy Graham Training Center at the Cove, and more Seat of Buncombe Co., at the confluence of the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers; incorporated in 1882. Situated on a plateau between the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky mountains, Asheville is a commercial and manufacturing center and a mountain resort. Manufactures in the city include textiles, electronic equipment, precision instruments, forest products, and processed food. The city is headquarters for the Blue Ridge Parkway and three national forests. Today, Asheville is the largest city in Western North Carolina. Outstanding scenery and recreational opportunities make the Blue Ridge Parkway one of the most popular units of the National Park System. "America's Favorite Drive" winds its way 469 miles through mountain meadows and past seemingly endless vistas. Split-rail fences, old farmsteads and historic structures complement spectacular views of distant mountains and neighboring valleys. Building the Parkway through mountainous terrain was a monumental labor. Authorized in the 1930s as a Depression-era public works project, the Parkway was more than a half-century in the making. It was the nation's first, and ultimately longest, rural parkway, connecting Shenandoah National Park in Virginia with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Enduring standards for parkway engineering and design were pioneered here. Billy Graham Training Center at the Cove with include: Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Eckerd Seminar Room, Pictorial Display, Gift Shop, Chapel & Prayer Room Additional Fee $

 

Hills & Hollows approximately 1 Hour $250.00
Mountain Music & Storytelling - Mike & Kathy Gwinn Give us an hour & we will give you a hundred years. From Moonshine to Black Bears, from an Old Country Church to Dolly's Front Porch, we take you on a delightful journey back in time when life was simpler and love was pure. Pull up a chair and listen to some of the stories and songs that made the Smoky Mountains "Home Sweet Home" to so many folks. Our journey through these dusty old country roads will warm your spirit and touch your heart. Let the lessons from the Past bring you wisdom in the Present to enrich your life in the Future. Custom storytelling for groups – choose a topic: Valentines, Thanksgiving, Christmas, “Turn the Radio On - 20’s & 30’s Radio”, Little River Logging and Circuit Riding Preachers to name a few.

 


image